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Archive for July, 2009

Leaving a legacy to build on

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Carl Kuttler ends golden era as St. Petersburg College President
St. Petersburg Times/Tampabay.com, July 22

Longtime SPC President resigns
Tampa Tribune/tbo.com, July 22

Longtime SPC President announces retirement
WTSP-Channel 10, July 22

Carl Kuttler Jr. to retire as SPC President
Tampa Bay Business Journal, July 21

St. Petersburg College President retiring
Bay News 9, July 21

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President Carl M. Kuttler Jr.

President Carl M. Kuttler Jr.

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (JULY 21, 2009) –

St. Petersburg College President Carl M. Kuttler, Jr., announced Tuesday he will retire in the near future. The announcement was made to members of the college Board of Trustees at their regular monthly meeting. SPC faculty and staff were notified immediately after the meeting.

 

Kuttler, 69, has been president since 1978 and is one of the longest-serving college or university presidents in Florida.

During his tenure, the college has gone from a two-year junior college to a four-year state college which offers more than 20 baccalaureate degrees. More than 100 baccalaureate, master’s and doctoral degrees are offered through the college’s University Partnership Center.

In addition, the college has expanded from two campuses to 10 learning sites and has one of the most highly acclaimed distance learning programs in the nation. The college owns and operates two museums (the Leepa-Rattner Museum in Tarpon Springs and the Florida International Museum in St. Petersburg) as well as the Palladium Theater in St. Petersburg. SPC recently expanded its Downtown Center to include office space for the Florida Orchestra, and office space and a theater for American Stage.

Over the years, Kuttler has received numerous awards and recognitions, including being named the top community college president in the nation in 1998 by the Association of Community College Trustees.  He has worked alongside many foreign dignitaries, including former Russian President Vladimir Putin, for the advancement of world peace and post secondary education. He currently serves as Honorary Consul to the Russian Federation.

St. Petersburg College, founded in 1927, is one of the largest state colleges in Florida, serving more than 60,000 students annually. The college’s Board of Trustees will select Kuttler’s successor.

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 SPC LEED GoldCLEARWATER, Fla. (July 13, 2009) – St. Petersburg College announced today that for the second time in as many months, the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) has awarded LEED Gold certification for one of its new campus buildings.
 The Natural Science, Mathematics and College of Education building on the Clearwater campus received the certification. The other LEED Gold building is the Student Services building on the St Petersburg/Gibbs campus. 
 LEED stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design. Gold is its second highest designation.
 The certification was issued July 1 for the design-build project, built by W.G. Mills, Inc. and designed in association with Flad Architects.
 Both buildings opened in January. They were built to conform to the LEED Green Building Rating System™, a nationally accepted certifier of high performance and environmentally sensitive buildings.
 “Environmentally friendly building operations provide nearly 40% of the solution to the climate change issue,” said Jason Green, SPC’s Sustainability Coordinator. “Even though climate change exists as part of a global challenge, we are attempting to address it locally through sustainable building design and other college-wide initiatives.”
 Both buildings were designed to decrease pollution and negative impacts on the environment; decrease impact on local aquifers; decrease energy consumption; and increase the quality of indoor air and the indoor working environment.
 John L. Evans, SPC’s architect, said the college has always constructed buildings that are energy efficient.
 “SPC has always specified efficient buildings,” he said.  “Our design guidelines for this building were really not that different or more stringent that what we have been doing in the past.”
 The Natural Science, Mathematics and College of Education building includes “Green Cleaning” products. Reflective roofing and paving materials result in cooler surfaces. Fourteen preferred parking spaces are provided for fuel-efficient vehicles/carpools, and bicycle storage and shower/changing facilities are located within the building.
 Composite wood products contain no added urea formaldehyde, and all adhesives, paints and carpets meet low volatile organic compound (VOC) standards. To ensure proper function and minimize energy loss through building exhaust, chemistry laboratory fume hoods were tested and commissioned. There is no smoking within 25 feet of any entry.
The building’s design should inspire students, said Charm Callahan, SPC’s interior designer.
“This new green building provides an example for students to actually experience the impact of thoughtful and responsible design,” she said.
 Additional facts about the building:
– 43 percent water savings achieved through low-flow fixtures, dual-flush toilets and waterless urinals.
– At least 86 percent of all construction waste recycled. As a result, 3,147 tons of construction waste was diverted from landfill.
– On a cost basis, more than 5 percent of the materials used in the building were salvaged, refurbished or reused; 21 percent contain recycled content; and at least 30 percent were extracted, harvested, recovered, and/or manufactured within 500 miles of the building.
– 71 percent of wood-based materials and products were certified in accordance with the Forest Stewardship Council’s Principles and Criteria.
 “We can think of no better way to demonstrate our environmental commitment than through the LEED certified buildings we construct, and the existing buildings we renovate,” said Carl M. Kuttler, Jr., SPC President.
 For more information, visit http://www.spcollege.edu/sustainability/.

 

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 ST. PETERSBURG, Fla.  – St. Petersburg College’s Office for Sustainability said Wednesday there are a number of ways to add some green to America’s most red, white and blue holiday.
 Jason Green, SPC’s sustainability coordinator, said Americans will light up more than 60 million barbecues and will roast about 150 million hot dogs and 890 million pounds of chicken and red meat on the Fourth of July weekend.
 “A typical party of thirty guests can create 80 pounds of waste,” Green said. “It’s estimated that Americans using their grills on July 4 will create the same amount of carbon dioxide as if 2,300 acres of forest were burnt.”
 There are other environmental problems associated with the celebration of the Fourth, he said. Fireworks contain potassium perchlorate, which gets into the soil, air and water and causes damage to the thyroid gland.  Other ingredients include such heavy metals as barium and copper, which are toxic.
 So what are the best ways to celebrate the holiday season in an environmentally friendly way? Here are some ideas:
• For July 4 parties, use real plates, silverware and cloth napkins and stay away from paper napkins, disposable paper plates and plastic utensils.  If you must use disposable plates, buy plates that are biodegradable. In fact, some disposable plates are made from corn, potato and sugar-cane pulp.
• Throw a potluck party to share resources and carpool.
• Prepare meals and desserts with locally grown organic ingredients and free range grass fed meats and poultry.
• Balance your meat dishes with more sustainable vegetable-based items.
• Provide recycling bins for glass bottles, cans and plastic.
• When BBQ-ing, use natural gas grills — they pollute less than charcoal grills.  To make matters worse, over-charring meat produces toxic chemicals in the food itself.
• Don’t shoot off polluting fireworks at home; instead, go to one of the city- or county-sponsored events.
• Try a natural insect repellent.  Frequently reapply basic essential oils like lavender, rosemary and cedar wood. These oils can trick insects into thinking you’re a plant. 
• If you must use a DEET based insect repellent, choose products with less than 20% DEET. Never apply over cuts or wounds; never apply on infants or use if you are taking any medications; don’t spray in enclosed areas; and wash skin with soap and water after use.
• Use environmentally friendly cleaning products and cloths or micro fiber rags to clean up after the party.
 To learn more about the sustainable | SPC initiative, visit www.spcollege.edu/sustainability or call Jason Green at 341-3283.

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