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Share this moment with friends and family by using the #SPCGrad hashtag and any of our images for your social media accounts.

St. Petersburg College will mark its 125th commencement ceremony at 10 a.m. Saturday, July 26, at First Baptist Church of Indian Rocks. About 350 of the 1,121 graduates are expected to participate.

“We congratulate the students – and their families – who have persevered to this graduation milestone. They always inspire us with their determination,” said President Bill Law.

SPC dates back to 1927 when it became Florida’s first two-year institution of higher learning. There were 48 members of the first graduating class in 1929.

Saturday’s ceremony is expected to last about an hour. Featured speakers include Crystal Hampton, representing four-year programs, and Tait Sorenson, representing lower division programs.

“I’m 35, but (my mom) still treats me like her baby girl, saying how proud she is of my accomplishments and being selected as the commencement speaker,” said Hampton, who will earn a bachelor’s degree in Health Services Administration. Read her story here.

“The faculty and the advisors at SPC really encouraged me in finding the roadmap that would get me where I wanted to be,” said Sorenson, who will earn his A.A. degree from SPC and pursue a bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering at the University of Central Florida in the fall. Read his story here.

Graduates and guests can check our instructions page for the big day. You can also follow social media posts and catch a live stream of the ceremony on our page dedicated to the ceremony.

Here are our summer graduates by the numbers:

Summer-2014-graduation-infographic[1]

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St. Petersburg College has received national recognition for making significant strides in its effort to increase minority student enrollment and success.

SPC made the list as No. 83 in the Top 100 Four-Year Colleges and Universities Enrollment Undergraduate Degrees by Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education Magazine in May 2014.

The move to increase Hispanic student enrollment at SPC is underway in light of the recent passage of House Bill 851, more commonly known as the immigrant tuition bill. The bill allows Florida colleges and universities to waive out-of-state fees for undocumented immigrants who attended state high schools.

Stan Vittetoe, Provost at the SPC Clearwater Campus, said the Hispanic population is underserved.

“They make up more than 20 percent of the Clearwater population but represent only 10 percent of our enrollment,” he said.

In 2012, SPC launched The College Experience, a major initiative to increase student success and graduations. While the plan is producing positive results, the greatest advances have been among African-American and Hispanic males.

“All of the components in The College Experience have a demonstrated impact on the success rates of students, particularly minority students,” Vittetoe said.

In addition to these institutional initiatives, the college also is reaching out to the international community, including Hispanics, in a variety of other ways. The most recent outreach activity was the FIFA World Cup viewing party at the Clearwater Campus on June 17. More than 100 community members attended the free event, which was open to SPC students, staff and members of the public.

“We think that these kinds of events will help members of the Hispanic community become aware of the campus and the educational opportunities here,” Vittetoe said.

Success among minority students

Success Among Minority Students infographic

Narrowing the Achievement Gap

A comparison of First-Time-in-College male ethnicities shows that the achievement gap between key ethnic groups at SPC is narrowing.

Narrowing the Gap infographic

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Dr. Bill Law

Dr. Bill Law

St. Petersburg College President Bill Law, who completed his fourth year as college president earlier this month, received a contract extension through June 30, 2017 and an exemplary performance review from the SPC Board of Trustees on Tuesday, June 17.

Board Chair Deveron Gibbons praised Law’s leadership, expertise and creativity and his commitment to the college’s mission of promoting student success and enriching local communities through education, career development and self-discovery. Board members reviewed Law on leadership, diversity of initiatives, planning, budgeting and external relations.

“One of the principal charges given to Dr. Law at the start of his tenure was to refocus our efforts on the core mission of this institution,” said Gibbons. “Dr. Law has performed this portion of his responsibilities at the highest level of leadership. (SPC’s) College Experience project has significantly improved the classroom success of our students across the board.”

Law created The College Experience in 2012 to ensure students finish what they start and succeed. The five major components of The College Experience include:
·      Out-of-class support
·      Integrated career and academic advising
·      New student orientation
·      My Learning Plan (a roadmap for graduation)
·      Early alert and student coaching system

Since The College Experience launched, SPC students have shown significant academic improvements, but the greatest advances have been among African-American and Hispanic males. For African American males, success rates jumped from 42% in Spring 2012 to 58% this spring. For Hispanic males, the success rate rose from 53% to 68%.

Law holds weekly meetings with college staff to review progress reports and success metrics and communicates these goals throughout the college.

In his review, Gibbons also noted that Law has succeeded in the past year in:
·      Moving forward with the complex development of the Midtown Campus
·      Renewing SPC’s online education program
·      Formulating a student-focused response to major changes in the state guidelines for developmental education
·      Expanding the college’s commitments to workforce education across all levels of the college’s instructional mission.

“Our consistent, superior audit reviews, budgeting, and strategic planning, have been able to put into motion, a plan for future success,” Gibbons said. “President Law continues to be an effective spokesperson for the college in Tallahassee and our college continues to perform at a very high level in the key areas of postsecondary education policy.”

 

Board Chairman Deveron Gibbons

Board Chairman Deveron Gibbons

Board Chairman Deveron Gibbons read the following statement regarding the president’s review:

Earlier this month, Dr. Law will be completed his fourth year as president of St. Petersburg College. As you know, one of the responsibilities of this board is to perform an annual review and evaluation of his performance over the past year.

To that end, board members have had the opportunity to meet with Dr. Law individually, and to complete a comprehensive, written evaluation assessing his performance. The categories we reviewed included, but were not limited to: Leadership, Diversity Initiatives, Planning & Budgeting, Board Relations, and External Relations.

I have had an opportunity to review all of the evaluations, and am pleased to report that they are exemplary.

One of the principal charges given to Dr. Law at the start of his tenure was to refocus our efforts on the core mission of this institution. Dr. Law has performed this portion of his responsibilities at the highest level of leadership. The college’s College Experience project has significantly improved the classroom success of our students across the board.

His efforts included support for students beyond the classroom, improved systems to support intake, counseling, advising and student activities, renewing community and school district relationships, technology enhancements, facilities maintenance, remodeling and repair, and support and development for our faculty, administration and staff.

Our consistent, superior audit reviews, budgeting, and strategic planning, have been able to put into motion, a plan for future success. President Law continues to be an effective spokesperson for the college in Tallahassee and our college continues to perform at a very high level in the key areas of postsecondary education policy.

In the past year, Dr. Law has been successful in moving forward with the complex development of the Midtown Campus, the renewal of our online education program, and formulating a student-focused response to major changes in the state guidelines for developmental education. President Law continues to expand the college’s commitments to workforce education across all levels of our college’s instructional mission.

In view of Dr. Law’s superior performance, as chairman, I would like to move that we extend his employment contract an additional year, as we did last year at this time. This one year extension, would be added on to his existing 3 year contract, thereby extending his employment agreement with the college to June 30, 2017.

While our review is limited to the performance of the president, I would be remiss if I did not acknowledge the tireless efforts of all the faculty and staff. Dr. Law prepared a written summary of progress over the last year, and in it, he specifically mentioned many of you individually, and did so with high praise. Our faculty, administration and support staff do a lot of the ‘heavy lifting’, and we know that. While Dr. Law provides the leadership, expertise and creativity to set the plan in motion, our success would not occur without your continued commitment to SPC and our students. On behalf of this board, we thank you.

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Join community members and St. Petersburg College students as they plant sea oats to honor Sen. Dennis L. Jones at 8:30 a.m., Saturday, June 28, at Gulf Front Park, 10400 Gulf Blvd. in Treasure Island.

Jones was the inaugural recipient of the Distinguished Public Service Award last year from the Institute for Strategic Policy Solutions at St. Petersburg College. The institute, the City of Treasure Island and the Treasure Island Beach Stewardship Committee are sponsoring the event.

The effort commemorates Jones’ 32 years of public service and his efforts to preserve the shorelines of Pinellas County and Florida. Jones earned the nickname “Sandman” for his work on the Florida Beach and Shore Preservation Act, which was consequently named for him.

In 1998, Jones helped create a fund for beach restoration and maintenance that receives about $20 million a year from state taxes. To date, this fund has contributed $541.6 million to beach restoration projects in cost-sharing efforts with local governments on local and federally authorized projects, resulting in the restoration of more than 226.7 miles, or nearly 57%, of the state’s critically eroded beaches.

To volunteer, register today.

Follow the Institute for Strategic Policy Solutions on Twitter at #polisol.

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For the third year in a row, students at St. Petersburg College have improved their academic performance, validating the college’s efforts to help students finish what they start and succeed.

For the past three years, SPC has focused on improving student success rates, defined as earning a grade of A, B or C in a course. During that time, success rates for all students in all courses for the spring semester have increased slightly, from 73.4% to 74.9%.

The rates for First-Time-in-College students, however, are much more telling, and reflect the efforts the college has made to help students thrive. Traditionally, FTIC students have struggled and dropped their classes more often than other students.

While overall success rates for FTIC students dipped slightly from last year, they have climbed 5% from spring 2012. Rates for minority males rose even higher over the past three semesters, affirming the college’s approach.

For African-American males, success rates jumped from 42% in spring 2012 to 58% this spring. For Hispanic males, the success rate rose from 53% to 68%.

In developmental education courses, the results are even more dramatic, despite the fact that SPC can no longer require many students to take these college preparatory courses. Last year, the state Legislature barred colleges from requiring a placement test or college prep courses of students who were in ninth grade in a Florida public school in 2003 or later and who subsequently graduated with a standard high school diploma from a Florida public school or who are currently active military.

Since spring 2012, success rates for all SPC students taking developmental courses grew 9%. For African-American males, that number jumped 24% from 38% to 62%. For Hispanic males, success rates grew 23%, from 51% to 74% from spring 2012 to spring 2014.

“These are pretty impressive gains, so we know the initiatives we have in place are working,” said Jesse Coraggio, Associate Vice President for Institutional Effectiveness, Research and Grants. “Especially in developmental education, the deans and faculty in these areas did a lot of work to make sure we had new strategies.”

Those college readiness strategies include the following tools that SPC students can take advantage of:

FTIC SuccessRates

 

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Bay Pines Learning Center

St. Petersburg College will receive $2.5 million this year from the state to complete its Bay Pines Learning Center, a hands-on science learning complex adjacent to the Intracoastal Waterway in Pinellas County. The funding was included in Florida’s $77 billion budget, which the Florida Legislature passed May 2 and Gov. Rick Scott signed on Monday.

The Learning Center will provide undergraduate research opportunities in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) for students, professional development for faculty and teachers and an engaging outlet for the community to interact with and participate in science.

“This will be a completely new environment for studying environmental and marine science,” said John Chapin, Dean of Natural Science at SPC. “This environment will get people excited about science. It’s designed to raise enthusiasm about the natural world and further studies in science, not just among our students, but all students, including elementary, middle and high schoolers.”

The project received $2.5 million from the legislature last year, which helped cover planning and permitting. The $5 million project will eventually include:

  • A traditional classroom building that can be divided into two rooms. Each classroom space will support both class and laboratory activities.
  • A building to house ongoing, independent student research projects
  • A multi-purpose building with capacity for 100 participants

Facilities also will include a docking area for small boats, a terrace and an area with saltwater tanks for unloading and cleaning specimens.

The center will better prepare teachers in STEM areas by offering certificates, in-service training and summer institutes to teachers, teaching assistants and administrators. It also aims to increase scientific literacy and life-long learning in science among students and community members.

Officials hope that by offering summer camps for middle and high school students, a venue for science fairs, and citizen science projects, students and their families will connect with nature and science.

STEM education is crucial, as those who work in these fields drive innovation, generate technological advances and play a key role in the growth and stability of the U.S. economy. Over the next ten years, these areas are expected to create 1.2 million jobs, but American business owners are increasingly concerned about a shortage of qualified workers for them.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and U.S. Department of Commerce’s Economics and Statistics Administration:

  • 7 of the 10 projected fastest-growing occupations over the next 10 years will be in STEM fields
  • STEM occupations have grown 8 percent in the last 10 years (2000-2010) and are expected to grow twice as fast (17 percent) in the next 10 years, compared to 9.8 percent for non-STEM occupations.
  • 16 of the 25 highest-paying jobs in 2010 required STEM preparation
  • STEM workers earn 26 percent more than their non-STEM peers.
  • A vast majority (80 percent) of jobs in the next decade will require technology skills.

At the Bay Pines Learning Center, SPC will collaborate with Admiral Farragut Academy, the City of Seminole, the Florida Institute of Oceanography, Pinellas County Schools and the U.S. Geological Society to bolster research activities, which has been shown to increase levels of engagement, success and degree completion.

At SPC, students can earn the following:

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The Institute for Strategic Policy Solutions will host a forum entitled “Our Families’ Four Generations: Ready or Not, Here We Are!” from 7 to 9 p.m., Tuesday, June 17, 2014, at the SPC Seminole Campus Digitorium. The forum is jointly hosted by the 4Generations Institute of Tallahassee and the Institute for Strategic Policy Solutions at SPC. The Tampa Bay Times is Presenting Sponsor.

4 Gen Flyer Graphic LgThe public is invited and advance registration is required at http://solutions.spcollege.edu.

Advances in medicine, workplace safety, risk management and healthy nutrition practices in the last 50 years have vastly increased life expectancy in the United States. As a result, Americans are experiencing an unprecedented demographic shift: four full generations in relatively good health living side by side.

Florida is a model of the demographic reality the nation will face in 40 years. There are currently 3.3 million Floridians, age 65-plus, living in the Sunshine State – 18 percent of the population. More than 500,000 of them are over 85. Pinellas County’s age demographics are even more tilted toward an older population: 21.5 percent of its population are 65 or older, and 4 percent are 85-plus.

How our four generations – children, parents, grandparents and super-elders – can live in harmony and mutual support is the subject of this community conversation.

A panel of experts representing programs serving each stage of life will explore how, by creative action and effective advocacy, the four generations can leverage the assets of each age group for the betterment of all.

“The needs for health care, education, family services, employment, public safety and environmental protection are best addressed through the lens of our four major age groups,” said Jack Levine, founder of 4Generations Institute. “How we address the needs of the four generations is among the most critical economic and public policy challenges for the next decade.”

The Community Conversation, moderated by Levine, will include six Pinellas County leaders whose organizations serve one or more of the four life stages:

  • Dr. Marcie Biddleman, Executive Director, Juvenile Welfare Board of Pinellas County
  • Eileen Boyle, Executive Director, Allegany Franciscan Ministries
  • Hon. Rene Flowers, Member of the Pinellas County School Board
  • Judge Raymond Gross of the Sixth Judicial Circuit Family Court
  • Jeff Johnson, Director, AARP of Florida
  • Shannon Reid, Vice President of Education and Practice Management, Raymond James Financial

The 4Generations Institute is a non-profit organization based in Tallahassee that promotes community volunteerism for the mutual benefit of the four generations: children/youth, parents, grandparents and elders. Its goal is to identify model intergenerational programs and projects, to expand the impact of quality mentoring and volunteer initiatives and to cultivate an environment to nurture communications across the generations.

The Institute for Strategic Policy Solutions at St. Petersburg College is a resource for academic enrichment, a non-partisan venue for civil, objective debate of topical public issues, a center to promote better government and a resource for sustainable economic development. Its mission is to support a broad array of research, training, educational and policy analysis and support activities at the local, state, regional and national levels.

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Event

The Seminole Community Library will be the location of the grand opening of the SPC’s new Innovation Lab next week.

YOU’RE INVITED:
SPC employees and the public are invited to the grand opening
Tuesday, June 3
11 a.m. to noon and 6 to 7 p.m.
Seminole Community Library at St. Petersburg College
9200 113th St., Seminole, LI 201.

The lab serves as a creative environment, often called a makerspace, that will provide people with common interests like computers, technology, science or digital arts a location to socialize and collaborate on ideas and learn new skills. Visitors to the SPC location will be able to learn how to program different devices, such as the Raspberry Pi, the Arduino Genuine Mega 2560 Board and the ProtoSnap LilyPad Development Board.

The lab offers:

  • 3-D printer
  • FreeFab3D Monolith 3D Printer built locally using other 3D printers
  • littleBits Synth Kit
  • Arduino Genuine Mega 2560 Circuit Board Experimentation Kit
  • Avid Fast Track Duo Audio Interface with Pro Tools Express
  • An iMac, 2 Linux computers, and 1 Windows computer
  • A variety of Open Source Software applications for 3D printing, design etc.
  • MaKey MaKey: Original Invention Kit
  • Cubelets KT06 Kit
  • ProtoSnap LilyPad Development Board
  • 2 CanaKit Raspberry Pi Ultimate Starter Kits
  • Apollo Precision Tools 53-Piece Tool Kit
  • Parallax Programmable Boe-Bot Robot Kit
  • Elenco Deluxe Learn To Solder Kit
  • Samsung 32-Inch 1080p LED HDTV with Logitech TV Cam HD for Skype Calls
  • Chromecast
  • Online File Distribution System for access to project files, open access resources, etc.
  • Reference collection including books and magazines

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Officials from St. Petersburg College, LumaStream and the City of St. Petersburg recently celebrated the grand opening of LumaStream’s new high-tech manufacturing facility headquarters, where three SPC graduates are now working.

LumaStream, a low-voltage LED solutions provider, relocated from Canada last year to Midtown with the support of St. Pete’s Enterprise Zone initiative. The facility’s launch highlights a job training partnership between LumaStream, SPC and the Florida TRADE Consortium, a federal grant program that St. Petersburg College is spearheading to train workers in advanced manufacturing.

“Our definition of student success is that students finish what they start,” said SPC President Dr. Bill Law. “In working with LumaStream, we put together an idea of how we might do some workforce development differently: How we might start together and finish together at the same time; How our students could benefit by not just our instruction but by being part of the operation itself. And we sit here today with the first results. The students have made it to the finish line. We put the medal around their neck, we congratulate them, and we say ‘what’s next?’ ”

SPC graduates Frank Arent, Brandon Carver and Bryan Calhoun join SPC President

SPC graduates Frank Arent, Brandon Carver and Bryan Calhoun join SPC President Bill Law at LumaStream’s grand opening Friday, May 23.

After completing their 18-week computer numerical controlled (CNC) training, three SPC graduates were hired by LumaStream. For machinist assistant Bryan Calhoun, making the switch from dental technician to manufacturing was much easier with SPC’s training.

“I really had no experience working in manufacturing on this level,” said Calhoun, who worked as a dental technician for 25 years but had a hard time finding work the past three years. “For once, I’m not looking at other places for work. I’m happy, I’m satisfied, and I want to see where this is going.”

Law joined St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman and LumaStream CEO Eric Higgs in cutting the ribbon for the new building at 2201 First Ave. S. LumaStream currently employs 25 people, but will likely need up to 200 over the next five years, as the business expands, Higgs said. The new facility will triple the production capacity of LumaStream, whose primary customer base includes restaurant and retail chains.

“This is an extraordinary opportunity for students,” Higgs said. “They not only learn their specific job but how their job impacts the organization. The college has moved at an astounding pace to make this happen.”

LumaStream partners with SPC through Florida TRADE, which serves displaced, unemployed and incumbent workers, students and veterans. The grant program provides short-term, hands-on training for high-wage, high-demand jobs in today’s technology-driven manufacturing market. Trainees can receive national certifications, paid internships and job placement services in a relatively short amount of time: 18 weeks or less.

“We do not have to move at a snail’s pace,” Law said. “We can, in fact, meet the needs of business and industry on a timely basis, step-by-step every way.”

Another CNC training class begins at the end of July. Students can apply by contacting:

Jill Flansburg, Florida TRADE at SPC Program Coordinator
flansburg.jill@spcollege.edu
727-791-2508

This workforce product was funded by a grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration. The product was created by the grantee and does not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Labor. The U.S. Department of Labor makes no guarantees, warranties, or assurances of any kind, express or implied, with respect to such information, including any information on linked sites and including, but not limited to, accuracy of the information or its completeness, timeliness, usefulness, adequacy, continued availability, or ownership. 

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drum6The drumbeats were steady and deliberate, echoing through the halls of SPC’s Midtown Campus. Within minutes, students who had never seen a West African Djembe or Ashiko drum were enthralled, captivated by the rhythm they were creating in the room.

“It’s going to get loud in here,” said facilitator and drum circle leader Steve Turner as he welcomed students to Meg Delgato’s Biological Issues class earlier this semester.

It got so loud, in fact, that they were soon asked to drum outside, where students who had not participated much in class came alive.

“I’m not really a science person, but I love music,” said Antonio Williams, who is studying business. “To be able to combine something I don’t like with something I do like was great.”

YOU’RE INVITED:
See what the students in Meg Delgato’s Biological Issues class learned by combining music and science.
May 1
11 a.m.to 1:30 p.m.
Royal Theater, 1011 22nd St. S
across from the Midtown campus

“This was one science class I knew I couldn’t do without,” said Devin Plant, who graduates this semester and plans to study psychology. “We’re making it scientific and finding out it’s fun.”

Those words are, ahem, music to Delgato’s ears.

With the help of a $3,500 Innovation Grant from the St. Petersburg College Foundation, Delgato created the semester-long class project called Instrumental Change: Using Drum Circles to Teach the Art of Science. Through the grant, students in her Midtown and Tarpon Springs classes partnered with staff from Giving Tree Music to research and investigate connections between art, music and science.


On May 1, from 11 a.m.to 1:30 p.m., her Midtown students will host a school-community drum circle event at the Royal Theater to unveil what they learned.

“Drumming helps people heal physically, boosts their immune system, creates a feeling of well-being and releases emotional trauma,” said student Lashondala Teagle, who plans on becoming a teacher. “It’s great for stress release and anxiety, which is why we’re holding our event around finals week.”

Teagle has worked with Turner before, when he visited the YMCA where she works.

“The kids love it,” she said. “It brings out the kid in all of us.”

Through Giving Tree Music, Turner sells his hand-made drums and leads “drum circles for human empowerment” for businesses, schools, at-risk youth, special needs groups, festivals and corporate team building seminars. He finds the energy incomparable.

“People make such powerful connections when they drum together,” said Turner, a graduate of SPC. “This really shows the power of teamwork and what it can do.”

drum1

Making science accessible

Ultimately, Delgato wants to make her Biological Issues class mean something more than checking a box to fulfill a life science requirement. She wants her students to make strong connections with science so they are prepared for a world that is flooded with information.

“The one thing I want to give my students is scientific literacy so they can make sense of the information they are bombarded with on a daily basis,” said Delgato, who has received Innovation Grants the past three years for various learning projects. “They need to be able to know what’s going on and be equipped to analyze the source of the information, not just accept things at face value.”

As voters and citizens, students continually make decisions about their communities and issues that affect them, like hurricane threats, air pollution, land usage, endangered species, flooding, waste, genetically altered food and pesticides, among others, Delgato said.

“I wanted to find innovative ways to make learning relevant and meaningful to them. Most of them won’t go to work in the sciences, and they have not had positive experiences in other science classes. But at the end of the day there are some very basic skills that we all need because the information that comes out of the sciences drives all that we know and do.”

What students discovered

In their research, students found studies that say drumming is a valuable treatment for chronic conditions such as stress, fatigue, anxiety, hypertension, asthma, chronic pain, arthritis, mental illness, migraines, cancer, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, stroke, paralysis, emotional disorders and a wide range of physical disabilities.

As for relieving stress, medical researchers have found that drumming increases the production and release of neurotransmitters and neurohormones like melatonin, norepinephrine, serotonin and prolactin into the bloodstream, which may contribute to patients’ relaxed and calm mood.

Students will present these findings, along with the cultural and historical aspects of drumming at their event.

“You’re really helping yourself when you do the research,” Teagle said. “Plus you can share all this research with your family and friends. It was a lot of work but it was fun. I’m comfortable with science now.”

Why scientific literacy matters

Being able to discern fact from fiction is a crucial skill in our advancing civilization. Consider:

  • A week’s worth of the New York Times contains more information today than a person was likely to come across in a lifetime in the 18th century.
  • In every minute of 2012 there were:
    • 72 hours of video posts
    • 347 blog posts
    • 700,000 Facebook entries
    • 30,000 tweets
    • 2 million e-mails sent
    • 12 million text messages
  • More data cross the Internet every second than were stored in the entire Internet 20 years ago.
  • There are currently 2.1 billion pages on the World Wide Web.

Sources: International Data Corporation, Harvard Business Review and MIT Technology Review

Credibility: What makes a good source

To check the credibility of sources, particularly on the Internet, Delgato recommends looking at the following.

  • Timeliness – when was the information published?
  • Authors – who wrote it? Are they clearly identified? What is their background? Do they have biases?
  • Authority – does the domain use edu, .gov, .org, or .net? (These are often more credible sources than .com.)

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